Flash Reports

International New Business Inquiries

Written by ChuckMeyst2015 on . Posted in Flash Reports

Flash Report – May 27, 2003

This BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT information is for agencyfinder.com Certified Agencies, Agency New Business Executives and agency subscribers. We communicate with registered member-agencies using e-mail.

CONTENTS:

1. International New Business Inquiries
2. Nothing Works – So We Do Everything!
3. Gift of Life Air Transportation
4. Shippensburg University Interns

INTERNATIONAL NEW BUSINESS INQUIRIES

Interesting to note that in the last month or so, we’ve seen searches by clients from San Juan, Puerto Rico and the Federal Republic of Nigeria. The Puerto Rican situation is a new tele-communications operation headquartered in Orlando, Florida. Following our process suggestion, the client made on-site agency visits for tours and to evaluate chemistry. That review is down to final presentations by three agencies next week.

The Nigerian review is short and sweet. The client is a non-profit organization founded by the wife of

the Vice President. This search is looking for US talk-show exposure and publicity. The client flew to Washington, DC and met with a handful of qualified agencies last week. The verdict is eminent.

NOTHING WORKS – SO WE DO EVERYTHING!

That was Jon Bond, CEO and prominent new business expert at New York and San Francisco’s kirshenbaum, bond & partners, speaking with me during their participation in our recent agency review for DuPont. Kirshenbaum is an active member of the agencyfinder Directors Club, but as Jon says, “Nothing works, so we do everything!”

More precisely, when it comes to agency new business development, it pays to do almost anything that makes sense. New business is a necessary agency investment; that’s something I came to appreciate during my tenure as Marketing Vice President at Sanders Consulting Group. That was demonstrated time and again by agencies of all size and kind; with any and all specializations. Agency execs that accepted the fact that new business was the lifeblood of an agency normally did all they could to:

1. Get the word out! (Proactive Outreach) 2. Get invitations coming in! (Stuart Sanders calls them Blue Birds; we respectfully call that the agencyfinder process!)

That’s why I’m pleased to announce our strategic alliance with Sanders Consulting Group and our sponsorship of The New Business Institute – their latest offering in new business development tips and techniques. We’ve already sent you one of their agency newsletters; we have a few more to send in the next few months. Make sure your agency is New Business Ready – keep your data fresh and current at agencyfinder.com; then attend The New Business Institute near you.

GIFT OF LIFE AIR TRANSPORTATION

There are times when an organization needs and deserves help. One such organization is Gift of Life Air Transportation, a non-profit that provides no-cost air transport service to patients and families. This Houston-area firm needs public relations and advertising to increase the donations that keep them flying (coast-to-coast). If you have room and time for a worthy pro-bono (or low-fee) account, contact us for more details and an RFI.

SHIPPENSBURG UNIVERSITY INTERNS

Professor Ron Taylor, PhD and Professor of Marketing at Shippensburg University (Shippensburg, PA) says he has some great students looking for intern positions in PA, NJ, MD, DE, VA and NY. They would prefer to be paid, but some may be able to offer their services for experience only. Contact Ron @ or call him at 717-477-1680.

Thanks for taking time to read this; we look forward to getting you face-to-face with a great prospect.

Sincerely,

Charles G. Meyst, Chairman/CEO

Business Partnering International, Ltd.
Vantage Place, 4327 Cox Road
Glen Allen, Virginia 23060 USA

New Business & The War – Mutually Exclusive?

Written by ChuckMeyst2015 on . Posted in Flash Reports

Flash Report – April 4, 2003

This BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT information is for agencyfinder.com Certified Agencies, Agency New Business Executives and agency subscribers. We communicate with registered member-agencies using e-mail.

CONTENTS:

1. New Business & The War – Mutually Exclusive?
2. One Last Gasp for ROAI
3. Almost Smart, Nice & Fine (work)
4. First Quarter Internet Traffic
5. They Left The Lights On

Good Afternoon,

I say that with some hesitation. Depending on the latest Centcom briefings from abroad, the day can be good or not so good, depending on how you see things. It is clear that our advertising economy is literally “hanging” on words of war. I don’t remember that it was at all like this when we went into Afghanistan. Imagine textbook content in the years to come, analyzing and accessing our economy from 9/11 forward.

In the meantime…

NEW BUSINESS & THE WAR – MUTUALLY EXCLUSIVE?

Many agencies question whether it’s possible to do new business, to actually get new clients while the war is on. All the sensory feeds tell us people are alternating between “business as usual” and reports from the front. And that’s not just at home. How many times did YOU check the NYTimes website today? The networks are getting slammed by CNN and Fox, but at the same time, everyone is engaged in name- calling as it relates to journalistic objectiveness. The press is alive with talk about clients and agencies strategizing the placing and pulling of ads. Enough already!

As long-time agency new business consultants (ad & pr), we can tell you that staying the course (as in hanging on to what you’ve got) will not necessarily keep you whole. You might argue that if your clients will just continue as they have been, you can adjust to “make ends meet.” Problem is that those clients are also looking for ways to “stay the course.” So they might elect to cut spending, and if all your clients do just a little of that, you’ll have to cut again yourself. And if you think you’re alone in seeing things dry up, your clients can set you straight!

If you’re relatively new to agency new business, maybe the expression “new business is the lifeblood of an agency” is NEW to you. But it’s a refrain that repeats year after year, in new business conferences nation- wide. Back in the early and mid 90’s, ADWEEK Magazine and Sanders Consulting Group produced scores of seminars coast-to-coast, teaching agencies the basics of new business development. There were some other famous new business educators – Tony Mikes and his folks at Second Wind; then our sister company Sales Marketing Institute, Ltd. tutored and consulted to many. But these seminars and consulting engagements were reduced in numbers as times got better and agencies were lulled into the belief that the “good times” would last forever. If only that had been true.

Please accept this as fact – agencies that want to survive need to practice pro-active new business development at ALL times. That means you need an outreach effort that encompasses some form of prospect database, some regular outreach effort (mailings, telephone calls, public speaking, etc.), plus outside training so you know what to do and how to conduct yourself when you get the chance to “pitch.”

You also need what Sanders called “Bluebirds.” Bluebirds are those unexplained, inexplicable inbound calls and client invitations you can’t directly

trace to your outreach efforts, but do seem to come as a result of the general flurry and new business energy. Those bluebirds come from agencyfinder.com. While you’re chasing “yours,” we’re chasing “ours” so they can become “yours.” ‘Nuff said.

ONE LAST GASP FOR ROAI

In last month’s Flash Report, we introduced the fact that we want to help address the question of ROAI and find some answers. We’re adding fields to our database that you’ll use to define how your agency confronts the issue of ROAI (Return on Advertising Investment). For that, we’d like your input and this is our “last gasp” request.

We don’t need your details now, (meaning you’ll have your chance for data input after we update the database) but we would like your input to identify labels for the fields and essays we should add. For instance, in our agency data section entitled Services Offered – what can we include to help YOU describe those services you use or bring to the table? Maybe you just call it “ROAI Measurement” – that works. Maybe you look for and measure an increase in sales. Rather than sales, maybe you measure inquiries. What or how have you “labeled” that? This is new and controversial territory – give us your input now so we can help. We’ll be adding one general Essay entitled ROAI Measurement, but if you have something else, let us know. You’ll see an announcement when we’re ready for your updated data. Take a moment NOW to write. Thanks!

To contribute your thoughts – Select Reply to Sender and insert your thoughts HERE.

ALMOST SMART, NICE & FINE (WORK) ET AL

We broke a slow but wide grin when this agency made application. The folks at Smart, Nice & Feinwork in Newburyport, MA (principals Julie Martin, Joan Seamster & Shiela Beninati come from diverse backgrounds and rather impressive Big-Boy agencies, but the name does bring a smile.

In their words – “OUR NAME SAYS IT ALL…and what clients deserve in an agency relationship. A team of smart, nice, experienced marketers that produce effective, “fein” work. ”

We’ve even got another – Ready, Willing & Abels in Denver, Colorado. Here’s what they have to say about themselves – “Over the years, we have been responsible for hundreds of advertising campaigns and absolutely love being in the advertising business. But you know the saying “all work and no play…” So outside the office, we’re passionate

about: hanging with our families and friends, skiing fresh powder, reeling in fish, making par, biking with a tail wind, hiking downhill, reading anything, traveling anywhere, listening to everything from Miles to Cowboy Mouth, lazing on a beach, or gazing at art.”

In both cases, these profound outpourings are found in the “essays” section where clients get a feeling for the potential of good chemistry.

Some agency names make them sound like law firms, but Feinwork or Ready seems more appropriate than Yellow Pirates, Heptagon or The Integrators.

FIRST QUARTER INTERNET TRAFFIC

Our site traffic is something of an investment tool. Right now in particular, the ebb and flow is directly linked to the war and stock market. We regard visits as our prime indicator, and that’s what our statistics are based on.

January this year was running 63% of last January; February at 76%; and March at 105%. Overall for the current quarter, the total is running at 80% of this time last year. Our rude, crude figuring suggests that agency searches and the economy go fairly well hand-in-hand. HEY LEFT THE LIGHTS ON

We managed two client searches on the west coast recently; San Francisco area specifically. It’s too much to expect that an agency that closes will notify everyone, but we’re often the last to know, and we generally learn when they don’t answer their phone, fax or e-mail. In these cases, the attrition rate was tremendous. San Fran has been hard hit by the recession (dot com specific), but we’re seeing the same thing throughout the country. A new agency registration is often offset by the demise or merger of others.

We only hope that the new business opportunities from agencyfinder.com can help you stay ahead of that curve.

Thanks for taking time to read this; we look forward to getting you face-to-face with a great prospect.

Sincerely,

Charles G. Meyst, Chairman/CEO

Business Partnering International, Ltd.
Vantage Place, 4327 Cox Road
Glen Allen, Virginia 23060 USA

How Do You Address ROI Measurement?

Written by ChuckMeyst2015 on . Posted in Flash Reports

Flash Report – March 6, 2003

This BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT information is for agencyfinder.com Certified Agencies, Agency New Business Executives and agency subscribers. We communicate with registered member-agencies using e-mail.

CONTENTS:

1. How Do You Address ROI Measurement?
2. How Do You Define ROAI?
3. Have You Experienced the
Purchasing Phenomena?

Good Morning,

This war/no-war situation is not helping our advertising and public relations industry. AdAge just reported – “Merrill Lynch Cuts Spending, Cites War.” It continued “Merrill Lynch is scaling back its advertising commitments starting this month as investors watch and wait for a resolution of the US standoff with Iraq.”

In clear trickle-down fashion, even here at BPI, Monday we mailed 25% but held back 75% of a client invitational postcard campaign, waiting to drop the balance until the future resolves itself. Clients of all size everywhere appear to be doing

the same. February 26th, AdAge reported “Advertising Executives Report Improved Business Climate.” Unfortunately, much of the activity benefiting the lucky few comes at the expense of the dearly departed – D’Arcy, Earle Palmer Brown, Hampel/Stefanides, Harris Drury Cohen, CreatAbility, etc. We’ll be enthusiastic in reporting a recovery when there is an overall increase in business activity for good reasons, not just the recirculation of existing business (we realize those who win are less concerned where it came from – until it’s their turn!)

In the meantime…

HOW DO YOU ADDRESS ROI MEASUREMENT?

Looks like ROI or ROAI (Return on Advertising Investment) is starting to get it’s share of the spotlight. Clients are asking for measurements, asking for the incorporation of techniques that show ROAI. Imagine – they actually want to know if their spending makes sense. Some of you have real evidence, maybe you’ve developed elaborate formulae to calculate and demonstrate. But there’s another school of thought. To quote Al Ries – “If an emphasis on creativity is the biggest mistake you can make, the second biggest advertising mistake you can make is looking for an ROAI, or return on advertising investment.” There’s more discussion in his latest book. Agencyfinder.com wants to help address the question and find some answers. We’re adding fields to our database that you’ll use to define how your agency confronts the issue. For that, we’d like your input.

HOW DO YOU DEFINE ROAI?

We don’t need your details now, (meaning you’ll have your chance for data input after we update the database) but we would like your input to identify labels for the fields and essays we should add. For instance, in our agency data section entitled Services Offered – what can we include to help YOU describe those services you use or bring to the table? Maybe you just call it “ROAI Measurement” – that works. Maybe you look for and measure an increase in sales. Rather than sales, maybe you measure inquiries. What or how have you “labeled” that? This is new and controversial territory – give us your input now so we can help.

We’ll be adding one general Essay entitled ROAI Measurement, but if you have something else, let us know. You’ll see an announcement when we’re ready for your updated data. Thanks!

HAVE YOU EXPERIENCED THE PURCHASING PHENOMENA

In our February 4th Flash Report, we reported on

increasing activity involving Procurement Departments. We’re digging a bit deeper, and although there aren’t widespread reports of purchasing department involvement in management of the agency relationship, or active participation in the agency selection process, it is happening.

Here too we’d like your input; your thoughts pro and con; actual experience if you can share. How and when should the purchasing or procurement department be involved? Under what conditions? Under whose direction and supervision? What questions and request are fair, and what’s off limit?

Take a moment NOW to write.

TO CONTRIBUTE YOUR THOUGHTS – Select Reply to Sender and insert your thoughts HERE.

Thanks for taking time to read this; we look forward to getting you face-to-face with a great prospect.

Sincerely,

Charles G. Meyst, Chairman/CEO
Business Partnering International, Ltd.
Vantage Place, 4327 Cox Road
Glen Allen, VA 23060 USA
804-346-1812

The Fall of Advertising

Written by ChuckMeyst2015 on . Posted in Flash Reports

Flash Report – February 4, 2003

This BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT information is for agencyfinder.com Certified Agencies, Agency New Business Executives and agency subscribers. We communicate with registered member-agencies using e-mail.

CONTENTS:

1. The Fall of Advertising
2. Procurement Departments and Ad Agencies
3. Who Gets Invited?
4. Who Needs Consultants?
5. New Business Awards

Good Afternoon,

You should have been there! As one of 200 or so clients, agencies, consultants and staffers attending the January 23rd ANA Agency Relationship Forum at the New York Plaza, it was clear that every- one was, is and continues to be seriously concerned about the state of our industry. Concerned if advertising still works, if we’ll ever be able to measure and justify what we do, if clients can find the right agency without third-party assistance, if procurement (purchasing) departments are intending to take control of agency relationships, or if advertising has gone “too far.”

2003, with all it’s global, national and regional issues, is still forcing us to draw upon every creative, clever, unconventional idea we can muster to get us out of this fix we’re in.

At the moment, agency “new business development” means:

1. Not losing existing clients.
2. Compelling reasons why existing clients should “maintain” spending.
3. Growing “organically” (as in internal growth through existing clients)
4. THEN, acquiring qualified, high-quality new clients that fit your mix.

Here’s our latest news – there’s more than normal.

THE FALL OF ADVERTISING:

At that ANA event, 115 clients, 43 agencies, 10 consultants and 32 others sat and literally gasped at times as Al Ries (The Fall of Advertising and the Rise of PR) pranced back and forth on the stage and pontificated about the foibles of advertising and the power of public relations. We didn’t hear him say advertising was dead, just ridiculous entertainment experiments like the Super Bowl upside-down rear-end beer-drinking clown. He used some powerful examples, in particular he spoke about Bud – the “King of Beers” (not the Queen of Beers), and about Clydesdales (not clowns). He talked about the powerful integration of first building buzz on the street, then combining that with integrated but meaningful advertising; the combination, not the demise.

There’s been lots of fuss about Al’s book (week after week in AdAge and ADWEEK), but unless I’ve missed something, there has yet to be any advertising. But there sure is plenty of buzz!

Read more at: http://www.ana.net/ana_conf/conf.htm

PROCUREMENT DEPARTMENTS AND AD AGENCIES

If your agency has not yet been impacted by the growing trend to involve “procurement” in the client/ad agency relationship, this event signaled the fact that it’s coming. And it appears that it’s not going to go away. Why has this happened?

Companies are more and more vulnerable to the near-term success or failure of their marketing programs. Marketing – as in bringing goods and/or services to market (via advertising, public relations, sales promotion, and other such tactics) – is generally contracted to outside vendors. These ad

agencies, publicists and consultants are entrusted with hard-earned, precious budgets meant to contribute to the success of these companies. Clients assume these vendors are qualified to do that.

Yet in a country where accreditation and licensing is required of doctors, lawyers, pharmacists, engineers, dentists, psychiatrists, CPA’s and even “nail technicians”, no such requirements exist for these vendors. So those who purport to know how to craft influential and effective “marketing messages” are held to no minimum standards, nor are they required to be regulated or licensed. Marketing departments and ad agencies may not have definitive standards (methods for measurement or evaluating compliance), but purchasing departments HAVE been developing them.

Marketing budgets represent a tremendous expenditure for a company, so the process of selecting a marketing vendor, or “marketing partner,” is presumably no longer entrusted only to the marketing department – depending in-part for agency candidates by looking in the local yellow pages or asking business colleagues or media reps for recommendations – now Procurement wants to bring their precise and meticulous methods to the table. What’s appropriate then is the integration of methodical and linear Internet search-engine processes to identify qualified agencies, coupled with compliance and accreditation issues, then high-touch examinations of non-technical essentials including “creative” and “chemistry.”

Until some form of testing and accreditation is established by our industry, that makes the selection of an advertising, public relations or marketing firm a critical decision for every company and it means that existing relationships might also need to be re-examined.

Procurement departments are getting involved, and it’s not going to go away.

WHO GETS INVITED? 2

002 wasn’t necessarily an exciting year, but it was a good year for agencies that had a chance to compete for new business. In going over statistics for last year, we learned that of those registered agencies that were fully “certified” here at agencyfinder.com (as in selection-ready), almost 50% were selected and invited to participate in a client review. In general, clients ultimately invite about 1/3 of those they select in a preliminary round.

You certainly would know if your agency was invited in 2002; and if your agency was selected in a preliminary round, you can tell because you received an e-mail that began:

“Good Day! We thought you’d like to know that your agency was just selected in the preliminary round of a new CLIENT SEARCH. Since we started tracking such invitations on DATE, your agency has made it to this stage XX times.”

The DATE field is your agency’s initial registration date; the XX is our record of how many other times your agency made it this far.

If you have yet to be formally invited (you’d know because you got a multi-page fax invitation that identifies the client, client contact, budget, etc.), check to be certain your data is both complete and compelling. If you’re not certain or have questions, give our Kaille Padgett a call.

If your agency has not yet been selected in a preliminary round, it’s likely your record is incomplete. Missing or erroneous data (capitalized billings, employee count, office locations) or missing essays, case histories or even the confidential client list can be a factor. “Dirty-data-databases” don’t work well! Call Kaille if you have questions.

Check yours at: http://www.agencyfinder.com/agency-login.html WHO NEEDS CONSULTANTS?

At the New York Forum, the Search Consultant panel was launched with an off-putting “have you stopped beating your wife” question and things went downhill from there. That wasn’t fair, and it’s about time everyone accept the fact that consultants of all kinds are here to stay. Does that mean there’s room for a bad consultant? Certainly not!

Search consultants are needed where clients are rusty; where clients need help identifying exactly what they need in an agency, and what they don’t; when the client organization is a political hotbed that could cloud the process and confound the likelihood for any decent agency relationship; when the client isn’t interested in seeing the agency maintain profitability, or wants “Kinko’s-on-call;” where a client can’t see beyond pretty pictures or recognize the umbilical connection between strategy and execution; or where the client wants a “kept” shop to name-drop, rather than an extended-life marketing partner.

What’s the Search Consultant’s job? To facilitate the coming together of a handful of well pre-qualified agency candidates and a prepared, rehearsed client. To guide the client through that myriad of steps and examinations that will allow the client (not the consultant) to clearly see which agency is

ultimately the best choice. It means no tedious, redundant RFI’s or RFP’s. It means allowing each agency to speak with the client directly – no screening or big-brother thing.

It means allowing open dialogue and due-diligence early-on so agencies can see to drop out – saving time and much money. It means first visits and capability presentations at each agency and not at client head-quarters. It means client briefing documents (and non-disclosures) so each competing agency doesn’t have to assume or speculate. And it means no spec creative.

If it’s a New York client and a New York consultant, some would contend it’s pretty easy to find a New York agency. Lunch with stuff spread over a big table – AdAge and ADWEEK top-100 lists, ADWEEK and Redbook directories, then a generously circulated RFI and an anonymous tip to Stuart Elliott at the New York Times. But most clients want and deserve more than a “good-olde-boys” review. So above and beyond all the hand-holding and professional guidance, the search consultant owes each client the use of a meticulous process to identify that handful (not a shotgun field) of pre-qualified and worthy candidates carefully plucked from the sea of some 28,000 ad agencies in the U.S alone. That’s when clients need consultants.

Thanks for taking time to read this; we look forward to getting you face-to-face with a great prospect.

Sincerely,

Charles G. Meyst, Chairman/CEO
Business Partnering International, Ltd.
Vantage Place, 4327 Cox Road
Glen Allen, VA 23060 USA
804-346-1812

I Y’am What I Y’am

Written by ChuckMeyst2015 on . Posted in Flash Reports

Flash Report – January 7, 2003

This BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT information is for agencyfinder.com Certified Agencies, Agency New Business Executives and agency subscribers. We communicate with registered member-agencies using e-mail.

CONTENTS:

1. I Y’am What I Y’am
2. Your Agency Audit
3. BPI Marketing Activities
4. Enter With Caution
5. New Business Assistance
6. New Business Awards

Good Afternoon,

Our first newsletter this year is brief. Our purpose during 2003 is simple, focused and serious – to get your agency invited to speak with pre-qualified clients so you can perform your magic and win those accounts. We want to devote our full energies to those agencies that share this objective.

2003 is going to be a better year for Agencyfinder agencies. That’s less a prediction than a state-ment of need. 2002 was difficult for agencies everywhere. Long-standing brand-name agencies bit the dirt,

shuttering doors and sending employees packing. Small agencies got even smaller as they went virtual to survive. But some agencies did do quite well.

I Y’AM WHAT I Y’AM

We are what we are – agencyfinder is an on-line and then off-line consulting service to match pre-qualified clients (as in advertisers or pr clients) with your agency (as in advertising, pr, direct marketing, interactive, etc.). Yes, we use the Internet and an industrial-strength database to start, but we are trained, accomplished and accredited new business consultants first. Since 1990, we’ve taught agencies new business outreach, so we’re well qualified to offer you guidance on the best combination of new business elements for your firm.

There are other Internet services, but for the most part, those are really just on-line directories – industry generic, flat-file, read-only, non-interactive, non-distinguishing and annoying (from the searcher’s standpoint) in that they leave meaningful apples-and-apples comparison up to the searcher. That’s because they’re designed and run by well intending techies with little or no agency new business development experience. Clients repeatedly tell us they appreciate the agencyfinder differences. YOUR AGENCY AUDIT

This newsletter and the majority of our communication with your agency is sent to the person listed as the new business contact in your datafile, plus the listed alternate new business contact. That’s because you, someone who preceded you, or someone in management made the decision to register your agency, and like advertising in down times, your agency membership has its rewards. Periodically, we also confirm your agency’s status with your CEO or CFO.

OUR MARKETING ACTIVITIES For 2003, our ongoing marketing activities include an oversize 4/c postcard sent on a repeating basis to companies known to advertise and known to hire agencies, customized e-mail invitations to our opt-in client subscribers, special invitational e-mails to other qualified opt-in lists, reciprocal links with affiliate sites, ongoing search engine optimization, public relations and various vertical market print ads.

ENTER WITH CAUTION:

Our site is perfectly safe, but to work, your agency data MUST be current and accurate. Your data is what gets you found, and it’s what pre-qualifies you for our pre-qualified clients. We do screen all new agency applicants, but we take much at your word of

honor. You must enter clean, accurate data – don’t fib, don’t exaggerate and certainly don’t lie. When you get caught, clients don’t forget and they have been known to tell their business friends. This is not the place for your wish list; this is where you’re rewarded for experience and candor.

We’ll be checking the records looking for agencies that may need to spruce up or finish their data entry. If we spot something, we’ll drop you a note, or Kaille Padgett may telephone.

Updates are always FREE; check and update your agency data now: http://www.agencyfinder.com/agency-login.html

NEW BUSINESS ASSISTANCE

There’s more to new business than meeting with prospects. Since we’ve taught new business, since we live and breathe the various processes each and every day, call us and ask your questions. Not just how to use and benefit from agencyfinder.com, but about other outreach efforts you can also employ. That’s another benefit of your membership and we’re glad to help.

Thanks for taking time to read this; we look forward to getting you face-to-face with a great prospect.

Sincerely,

Charles G. Meyst, Chairman/CEO
Business Partnering International, Ltd.
Vantage Place, 4327 Cox Road
Glen Allen, VA 23060 USA
804-346-1812

Carfinder.com

Written by ChuckMeyst2015 on . Posted in Flash Reports

Flash Report – November 26, 2002

This BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT information is for agencyfinder.com Certified Agencies, Agency New Business Executives and agency subscribers. We communicate with registered member-agencies using e-mail.

CONTENTS:

1. Carfinder.com
2. RSVP Ann Landers
3. Agency Quiz # 2
4. Flash Report Library

CARFINDER.COM

We found ourselves looking for a new car a few weeks ago. It’s been some time, but I dialed in at Ford.com, and found agencyfinder’s long-lost sister, carfinder.com. Not so named, but darned near a spitting image as far as the process goes.

Find the site, choose your model, build your car, get MSRP, find a dealer, check dealer inventory, get some quotes. Hit SUBMIT and the dealers came pouring out of the trenches!

I’d forgotten the similarities. Back in 1998, we went looking to buy a Dodge Durango and had a similar experience. The e-mails promised we’d hear from each dealer within 24-hours. Even gave us the name of the manager who’d be calling.

But the phone didn’t ring! I called them and sure enough, they did have the inquiries but were working on some “other” issues. Do you PAY for this service? YES, about $3,000 per month. I suggested they pay closer attention to the business it was trying to bring them.

Not much has changed, with cars or agencies – but I’m delighted at how close our client/agency matchmaking service parallels that of the auto giants.

RSVP – ANN LANDERS

Dear Ann,

Are we old fashioned? My Marketing VP and I went to great lengths to examine, select and invite what we thought were some really fine agencies to take a look at our business as potential candidates to handle our account. We gave them a nice, clear invitation, with facts, figures and a reasonable RSVP. Maybe we expected too much. Maybe they didn’t realize we already knew who they were. But we did know them – even the name of the person who was supposed to handle their new business process.

Many did call, and we went forward with them and hired a great firm. But we can’t figure those that didn’t call. They just didn’t call – not us; not our consultant. We talk about them and our experience with our industry friends, and they too are puzzled. Are we old fashioned?

Signed – $250,000 in fees.

AGENCY QUIZ # 2

Long before agencyfinder was born, we were agency new business consultants. That’s why we share new business tips you might find useful. This quiz, and others we’ll drop in from time to time, are for that reason.

THE QUIZ: You’ re excited about making this next call. You finally learned the name of the influential VP of Marketing after chasing many dead-ends. You’ve got a compelling and well- rehearsed pitch that’s bound to make your point.

You dial the phone, and his assistant answers.

With articulate lips, precise diction and a bright, full smile she asks – “Will Mr. Tetress know what this call is about?”

You answer:

1. How would I know, is he some kind of telepathic mind reader?

2. Of course he won’t; not until I tell him!

3. He and I haven’t had a chance to discuss this, so the topic will be new.

4. I’m our agency’s president, so I’ll let him know when he comes to the line.

If you picked “1, 2 or 4”, I hope new business isn’t your full-time job! In this group, “3” might get you past this gate keeper; maybe not! What you’re really being asked is “Does Mr. Tetress know you, and will he take your call?” But we’re continually amazed when we hear it.

FLASH REPORT LIBRARY

We’re pack rats; we try to keep all the old Flash Reports in case we want to check how right or wrong we were back when. Now you can too, back to June 2000, since we’ve found a place to post them. Just click in at:

http://www.agencyfinder.com/agencynews.shtml

Thanks for taking time to read this; we look forward to getting you face-to-face with a great prospect.

Sincerely,

Charles G. Meyst, Chairman/CEO

Business Partnering International, Ltd.
Vantage Place, 4327 Cox Road
Glen Allen, Virginia 23060 USA

Need a Good New Client?

Written by ChuckMeyst2015 on . Posted in Flash Reports

Flash Report – August 21, 2001

This BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT information is for agencyfinder.com Certified Agencies, Agency New Business Executives and agency subscribers. We communicate with registered member-agencies using e-mail.

CONTENTS:

1. Need a Good New Client?
2. 30 Days and Counting
3. Here’s Johnny!
4. Jack of One Trade
5. $18 Million in Referrals

NEED A GOOD NEW CLIENT?

When I read that an east coast agency has shuttered its west coast office, I’m reminded how vulnerable an agency is if it can’t replace lost business.

Sure the times are tuff, but that’s no excuse. I’d say about 1 agency in 10 has a new business development program that works. And remember, each time a client leaves, they end up somewhere else. With a good working program, it could be at your agency.

A proactive outreach new business program takes months to develop, but to the right client, you can make your agency stick like flypaper. BE CERTAIN your agencyfinder.com data elements, your essays, case histories and client list are complete and up-to-date. I shudder to know that an agency expects new business, but hasn’t done what it takes to earn it.

Other than that weird time between Christmas and New Year, this last week or two in August is your best time to clean and tidy up your agency new business “bits.” Be prepared for the Fall rush. And call if you need help, a password, or whatever!

30 DAYS AND COUNTING

Don’t mark your calendars, but watch for our announcement. We’ll be unveiling our brand new web site, with many additional features and benefits. Much of the re-design has to do with what we’ve learned during our first 5 years – improved navigation, more info, more options.

Simultaneously, we’re launching a client invitational campaign. We specifically target clients who advertise and who use agencies and pr firms. It’s not back-to-school; it’s back-to-business. We too are constantly upgrading agencies with new ones. Our next campaign targets North American shops. We’ll also be sending you a special-offer mailer. Look for it.

HERE’S JOHNNY!

If my memory serves me, Johnny Carson used to talk about an Encino auto dealer that sold every car for $100 below cost. How did they do it? Volume!

I’m not suggesting we have anything in common with Encino Man, but I can report that 2001 is the year of volume here @ agencyfinder.com. Admittedly, it’s coming in smaller increments (as in smaller budget searches), but it just keeps coming. Clients tell us they MUST GET value for their marketing investments, and where they don’t perceive that value, they move.

Most clients send signals, and seldom does one leave in the dead-of-night. Watch for the tell-tale signs. Do what you can to make them happy. If you conclude a departure is eminent, then DO SOMETHING to replace that business. But do it BEFORE, not after they leave.

JACK OF ONE TRADE

New business, new business, new business. That’s agencyfinder.com. We’re not a portal for breaking news, and

ed almost overnight? Why should clients be expected to shift to another agency (at the agency’s direction), or that employees accept similar shifts. How can this

happen? Is there a fix, a solution?

On just this subject, a city magazine publisher-friend spoke of his 25 staffers that produce their monthly magazine. Not only do they produce the magazine, but they also produce more than 50% of the ads – for clients that don’t have agencies themselves. “If we skipped publishing next month or any month thereafter, but still did the ads, we’d be an ad agency. Conversely, ad agencies are publishers without a magazine.”

That’s an interesting thought. Without that magazine, it suggests an agency has no public persona, no identity, it has no claim to fame and it has little equity, little brand. Not surprising it can “go away” overnight.

When an agency closes, many suffer. Employees need to find new jobs and families are jeopardized. Clients lose too – finding a replacement agency is neither quick nor easy; in fact, it’s costly in expense, manpower and marketing downtime. Agencies and clients alike have a vested interest in solving this problem.

This Special Edition Flash Report does not propose a solution, for one is not clearly apparent. Rather, we raise the question and ask for your input. We’ll collect, assimilate, consider and share your proposed solutions. We welcome your thoughts and comments. Write me directly – it really is a matter of serious and immediate concern.

Sincerely,

Charles G. Meyst, Chairman/CEO

Business Partnering International, Ltd.
Vantage Place, 4327 Cox Road
Glen Allen, Virginia 23060 USA

Proper Agency Contact

Written by ChuckMeyst2015 on . Posted in Flash Reports

Flash Report – July 16, 2001

This BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT information is for agencyfinder.com Certified Agencies, Agency New Business Executives and agency subscribers. We communicate with registered member-agencies using e-mail.

CONTENTS:

1. Proper Agency Contact

PROPER AGENCY CONTACT

You’re getting this Flash Report either because you’re listed as your agency’s new business contact, or because someone listed you as the alternate. If you get duplicates of this, then you are listed incorrectly at both places. Please remove the alternate listing.

To expedite client invitations and see that your agency is included in appropriate new client opportunities, we ask that your agency’s primary contact be a senior executive with authority to make participation decisions.

ALL official e-mail correspondence from agencyfinder will show the sender as BPI’s Agencyfinder. Where appropriate, we may use a

priority code and/or we may ask for receipt confirmation.

Sincerely,

Charles G. Meyst, Chairman/CEO

Business Partnering International, Ltd.
Vantage Place, 4327 Cox Road
Glen Allen, Virginia 23060 USA

Summer New Business Adjustments

Written by ChuckMeyst2015 on . Posted in Flash Reports

Flash Report – May 22, 2001

This BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT information is for agencyfinder.com Certified Agencies, Agency New Business Executives and agency subscribers. We communicate with registered member-agencies using e-mail.

CONTENTS:

1. Summer New Business Adjustments
2. A Day Late and $37,500 Short
3. Fishing for New Business
4. Milwaukee’s M3A

SUMMER NEW BUSINESS ADJUSTMENTS

We’re just days away from the agency summer tradition — short Fridays. In good and in slow times, most agencies manage to grab some much-deserved R & R by making Fridays half-days.

So, while you’re all enjoying that special time, we’ll be slogging away 24/7 to help manage just one more great client search to award the business to one more great agency. Please send pictures and postcards of your summer tans!

As an aside, in our “Trophy Room,” and

elsewhere throughout our offices, not only do we have great agency work on display, but a growing collection of agency “coffee mugs.” If you wish to exert your undue agency influence, send us your MUG!

A DAY LATE AND $37,500 SHORT

I’m flattered that I was invited to author something for ANA’s May issue of The Advertiser dealing with Global Marketing and Financial Management. With finance as the topic, we took a fresh look at the whole issue of agency searches. The cost ramifications of an ill-managed review are staggering. Get your hands on a copy; the article starts on page 59. See if you agree. Or, call us and we’ll send you a copy.

FISHING FOR NEW BUSINESS

Not far from our headquarters here in Glen Allen, there are two “fish’n holes.” Yesterday, like always, there were more than 100 Directors of Fishing Development gathered around the first one, dipping expensive lures in and out. Most folks around these parts know that pond is depleted, with no more than a couple of fish left.

As usual, around the second hole (which we perate), there were about 10 Directors of Fishing Development. But our pond is crystal clear and full of great fish, because we stock it daily. We charge a flat fee of $1 per day; Why? Because it costs us to keep it clean and well-stocked.

Late that afternoon, like always, one fisher person saunters over from the first hole, and says “I don’t mind paying to fish in your pond — as long as you guarantee I’ll catch some fish.” I answer, as always, “That’s why there’s a fish market. But you’ll pay 30 times more, and that gets you just one.”

As I head home, I holler over to the gang at the first hole — “Come on over here and fish!” They all look up, smile, and shout back — “Thanks, but we don’t pay to fish!”

MILWAUKEE’S M3A

May 8th marked the spring meeting for the Milwaukee Association of Advertising Agencies. Scott Rackham of Meyer & Wallis invited agencyfinder to present to the group on “New Business Tips andTrends.” More than 30 members participated and heard our Chairman address new business from the agency’s perspective, then from the client, selector consultant and agencyfinder’s point-of-view.

If your organization needs to book an “expert” to present an agency topic, we can help. Contact Jay Mangan, Director of Agency Services at the number below.

Sincerely,

Charles G. Meyst, Chairman/CEO

Business Partnering International, Ltd.
Vantage Place, 4327 Cox Road
Glen Allen, Virginia 23060 USA

Dirty Data Database

Written by ChuckMeyst2015 on . Posted in Flash Reports

Flash Report – March 30, 2001

This BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT information is for agencyfinder.com Certified Agencies, Agency New Business Executives and agency subscribers. We communicate with registered member-agencies using e-mail.

CONTENTS:

1. Dirty Data Database
2. Opt-in NaDa
3. Small Budget Opportunities

DIRTY DATA DATABASE

I suspect you try to respond to client concerns like we do. Here’s the situation.

We’ve had clients report that some invited agencies couldn’t support their claims for previous experience. The agency had samples, but for some reason didn’t know industry jargon, and ultimately couldn’t justify their credentials.

We call that Dirty Data Database. When you have a moment, review your selections in Section 9 — Fields Served, just to be certain they reflect what you want to claim. Our complex search algorithms let

clients specify and find your agency with precision that far exceeds any other on-line or off-line service. Agencyfinder.com operates on the premise that our clients search for agencies that already know their business, or their industry.

Translated: your data must define your present capabilities and actual experience. Our system is not meant to support “wish-list” profiles. Supposition selling belongs in your “outreach program.” Clients are done a major disservice if we introduce them to unqualified agencies. Unqualified agencies also displace truly qualified candidates.

OPT-IN NADA

New business professionals are always looking for new ways to get new clients. Your decision to register was a good one, as long as you understand what WE ARE NOT.

WE ARE NOT an opt-in RFP service. We’re a data-driven client/agency on-line and off-line match-making service that selects from the extensive data you provide. That’s why you need to enter much more than just a name and e-mail address.

Here’s a sample of one project currently available on an opt-in service we’ll call XXX Affiliates. “When you sign-up as an XXX Affiliate you will receive 14 months of projects matched to your specific expertise.”

“You can start responding to projects from the day you sign-up as an Affiliate. Budgeted amounts are typically just the starting point of a much larger opportunity, for firms in our program that offer the high-quality services we promote.”

“Project ID: 18000”
“Project Title: Optical Fiber Manufacturing Plant in China”

“Description: The client is looking for consulting services to setup an optical fiber manufacturing facility in China. The consulting firm must be capable of giving advise on equipment, process, training of personnel and testing.”

“Last Date to Accept Responses: March 30, 2001”
“Estimated Budget: $50,001-$100,000”

This was meant for affiliates in the “Consultant” category. Anybody interested?

SMALL BUDGET OPPORTUNITIES

March 15th I talked about small budget

opportunities that fall below our $1 million design threshold.

Through today, we’ve processed over 560 searches with budgets less than $1 million. That represented over $165 million that needed to be placed. This translates to about one search each business day. That’s the business that will be referred.

If your agency guarantees results from the work you do for your clients, we’d like to know. As much as we’d like to ourselves, we can’t. What we can do is look back at what’s happened so far. You can study our publicity link to see the clients, the values and the agencies that are getting the business, but the decision to get involved is yours.

Charles G. Meyst, Chairman/CEO

Business Partnering International, Ltd.
Vantage Place, 4327 Cox Road
Glen Allen, Virginia 23060 USA

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